What We Do

We build
investigative
journalism in the
SADC region of
Southern Africa in
the service of a free,
capable media and
open, accountable
democracy.

What We Do

We build investigative journalism in the SADC region of Southern Africa in the service of a free, capable media and open, accountable democracy.

We raise and de-risk philanthropic
funding for member investigative
journalism centres; we build
organisational capacity at member
centres; and we build investigative
capacity among journalists at
member centres and beyond.

We currently have member
centres in Zambia, Malawi,
Namibia, Botswana, Lesotho,
eSwatini and South Africa.

They are the leading independent,
non-profit investigative
newsrooms in each of their
countries. Some may be small, but
collectively they punch well above
their weight.

We raise and de-risk philanthropic funding for member investigative journalism centres; we build organisational capacity at member centres; and we build investigative capacity among journalists at member centres and beyond.

We currently have member centres in Zambia, Malawi, Namibia, Botswana, Lesotho, eSwatini and South Africa.

They are the leading independent, non-profit investigative newsrooms in each of their countries. Some may be small, but collectively they punch well above their weight.

Why We Do It

Though investigative
journalists in the
SADC region may
face substantial
challenges
individually,
collectively they hold
huge potential to
change their
societies for the
better. Investigative journalists and journalism centres are a prospect worth networking and nurturing, to increase their impact, to multiply their force. 

Why We Do It

Though investigative journalists in the SADC region may face substantial challenges individually, collectively they hold huge potential to change their societies for the better. Investigative journalists and journalism centres are a prospect worth networking and nurturing, to increase their impact, to multiply their force. 

Investigative journalists and
journalism centres are a prospect
worth networking and nurturing,
to increase their impact, to
multiply their force.
Investigative journalism is key to
democratic accountability. It
exposes wrongdoing, enabling
people to hold power to account.
The media has been debilitated by
the digital transition. As much as
the transition has brought new
and exciting means to serve the
public, the new economy it
birthed has been monopolised by
the platform giants, leaving those
who produce content scrambling
for the crumbs.
Because discovering the truth
takes more time and money than
reporting the obvious,
investigative journalism often
stands at the back of the queue
when resources are allocated, and
first in line when retrenchments
loom.

Investigative journalists and journalism centres are a prospect worth networking and nurturing, to increase their impact, to multiply their force. Investigative journalism is key to democratic accountability. It exposes wrongdoing, enabling people to hold power to account.The media has been debilitated by the digital transition. As much as the transition has brought new and exciting means to serve the public, the new economy it birthed has been monopolised by the platform giants, leaving those who produce content scrambling
for the crumbs. Because discovering the truth takes more time and money than reporting the obvious, investigative journalism often stands at the back of the queue when resources are allocated, and first in line when retrenchments
loom.

As a result, investigative
journalism is under-resourced and
underdeveloped, fighting an uphill
battle to match the sophistication
of the powerful whom it would
hold to account. At the exact time
when more capacity is needed to
discover and disseminate the
truth, investigative media is extra
hamstrung by the media’s
malaise.
In the developing world, the SADC
region included, there are
aggravating factors. There may be
even fewer resources to go
around, and physical repression.
The concentration of political and
economic power may make it
exceedingly hard to survive
without elite patronage and
protection. Independence is the
only solution, but it comes at a
price.

As a result, investigative journalism is under-resourced and underdeveloped, fighting an uphill battle to match the sophistication of the powerful whom it would hold to account. At the exact time when more capacity is needed to discover and disseminate the truth, investigative media is extra hamstrung by the media’s malaise. In the developing world, the SADC region included, there are aggravating factors. There may be even fewer resources to go around, and physical repression. The concentration of political and economic power may make it exceedingly hard to survive without elite patronage and protection. Independence is the only solution, but it comes at a price.

How We Do It

The IJ Hub was founded in 2019 to meet the challenge head-on of supporting and building independent investigative journalism in the SADC region.

Our solution is holistic and encompasses the following:

Raising and de-risking
philanthropic funding for
investigative journalism

We present a de-risked
opportunity for philanthropic
funders to support independent
investigative journalism in the
SADC region. Those who prefer
not to support centres directly
donate to our funding pool, which
we disburse to member centres
based on their relative needs and
accountability profiles.

In this way, funders contribute to
an established network
impactfully covering much of the
region; a collective growing in
capacity and reach.

Raising and de-risking philanthropic funding for investigative journalism

We present a de-risked opportunity for philanthropic funders to support independent investigative journalism in the SADC region. Those who prefer not to support centres directly donate to our funding pool, which we disburse to member centres based on their relative needs and accountability profiles.

In this way, funders contribute to an established network impactfully covering much of the region; a collective growing in capacity and reach.

Building the organisational and administrative capacity of
organisations practicing
investigative journalism

Making resources available to
member centres is not enough. A
centre’s editorial performance is
optimal when its organisational
base is solid. And increased
resource flows demand
heightened accountability.

We advise and assist member
centres with matters as diverse as
corporate registration, compliance
with non-profit requirements,
accounting, auditing, funding
applications, digital security and
websites.

Building the organisational and administrative capacity of
organisations practicing investigative journalism

Making resources available to member centres is not enough. A centre’s editorial performance is optimal when its organisational base is solid. And increased resource flows demand heightened accountability.

We advise and assist member centres with matters as diverse as corporate registration, compliancewith non-profit requirements, accounting, auditing, funding applications, digital security and websites.

Building the editorial capacity of organisations and journalists
practising investigative
journalism

We network and advise member
centres on editorial matters.
Where they feel they need it, we
help them get their stories ready
for publication.

We sponsor qualifying journalists
for three-month fellowships at
investigative newsrooms.

And we arrange workshops;
anything from investigations 101
to following the money, the latest
tools and techniques, and digital
security.

Building the editorial capacity of organisations and journalists
practising investigative journalism

We network and advise member centres on editorial matters. Where they feel they need it, we help them get their stories ready for publication.

We sponsor qualifying journalists for three-month fellowships atinvestigative newsrooms.

And we arrange workshops; anything from investigations 101 to following the money, the latest tools and techniques, and digital security.

Our People

The buck stops with three to five non-executive directors elected by member centres, and up to two ex-officio executive directors.

Prof Dumisani Moyo

Prof Dumisani Moyo

Non-executive chair

Prof Dumisani Moyo

Non-executive chair

Lionel Faull

Lionel Faull

Non-executive director

Lionel Faull

Non-executive director

Troye Lund

Troye Lund

Executive director

Troye Lund

Executive chair

Mantoe Phakathi

Mantoe Phakathi

Non-executive director

Mantoe Phakathi

Non-executive director

Steven Budlender

Steven Budlender

Non-executive director

Steven Budlender

Non-executive director

Sebenzile Nkambule

Sebenzile Nkambule

Executive director

Sebenzile Nkambule

Executive director

We build investigative
journalism.

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